DER GOLEM
An Evening of Silent Horror with Live Piano Accompaniment
Featuring Neil Brand
At Guy's Hospital Chapel on Saturday the 29th October 2022 - 7:00 pm

Continuing the Grand Guignol theme on Halloween weekend we invite you to steal into the spooky surroundings of Guy’s Hospital Chapel to experience a classic horror movie of the silver screen.

The Golem: How He Came into the World is the only surviving film of the Golem trilogy, made by German expressionist film director Paul Wegener in the early years of the Twentieth Century. Based on the old Jewish folk legend of a clay creature that is brought to life by black magic, Wegener wrote and directed the film and also starred as the Golem. The story is set in the ghetto of Medieval Prague where sorcerer and astrologer Rabbi Loew creates the Golem to save the Jewish community from persecution by the tyrannical Emperor Rudolph II. But the creature gets out of control and becomes a terrifying force of destruction, trailing fire and death in its wake.

The pianist providing the improvised accompaniment to Wegener’s kinetic lyricism will be Neil Brand

Tickets £15 including a delightful gin cocktail and a 20% donation towards the King's Chaplaincy Trust

Neil Brand
Branded “the doyen of silent film pianists” by Radio Four Neil Brand has been accompanying silent films for over 25 years, performing regularly at the NFT on London's South Bank and film festivals and special events throughout the world. He is considered one of the finest exponents of improvised silent film accompaniment in the world.

He has written the title music and scores for many TV documentaries including Paul Merton’s Silent Clowns, Silent Britain and Great Britons and scores for over 50 Radio 4 dramas including War and Peace, The Box of Delights, several of the BBC audio Shakespeare Collection plays and Sony award winner A Town Like Alice. Neil is also highly regarded as a writer of radio plays including the Sony-nominated Stan, which he adapted in 2006 to great acclaim for BBC4 TV.


Image Credit: An original poster for Der Golem from 1920. A Public Domain image courtesy of Wikimedia Images.